Saturday, May 25, 2019

Embrace the resurrection in those around you


America

Swiss clerics write to Francis about ‘heresy of clericalism’

11 April 2019, The Tablet

Swiss clerics write to Francis about ‘heresy of clericalism’


The vicar general of Zurich, Josef Annen, and the Synodal President of the Catholic Church in Zürich, Franziska Driessen-Reding, have appealed to Pope Francis in a dramatic open letter to take decisive measures against sexualised power and the “heresy of clericalism” in the Church, writes Christa Pongratz-Lippitt.

The letter was published in several Zürich dailies on 4 April.

“Dear Pope Francis, the Catholic Church is ablaze. The terrible thing is that shepherds who were appointed to serve the Gospel Message are responsible for this firestorm,” the letter begins. It goes on to say that many Catholics in the canton of Zurich are turning their backs on the Church. “They are alienated, indignant and bitter”, it says, and this applies not only to the younger generation but also the older generation that have been loyal church-goers all their lives.

Pope appoints four women to top Synod jobs


24 May 2019, The Tablet

Pope appoints four women to top Synod jobs


Sr Nathalie, told The Tablet that the appointments reflected the Pope’s desire for greater female representation at senior levels


Pope appoints four women to top Synod jobs
Xaviere Missionary Sister Nathalie Becquart
Photo: CNS/Paul Haring
Pope Francis has appointed the first women consultors to the secretariat of the Synod of Bishops, which under his pontificate has become a crucial vehicle for setting the Church's pastoral agenda.
Four women – three religious sisters – will be tasked with offering advice and strategic direction to the body which organises the synod of bishops gatherings.
The new consulters to the synod's General Secretariat include: Sister Nathalie Becquart, the former director of youth evangelisation and vocations for the French bishops conference, Sr Alessandra Smerilli, an economics lecturer at the Pontifical Faculty of Educational Sciences “Auxilium,” Sr Maria Luisa Berzosa, the director of educational institute of the Spanish branch of “Fe y Alegría” and Professor Cecilia Costa, a sociology lecturer at Roma Tre University.

As we honor veterans, may we find better ways to resolve conflict

As we honor veterans, may we find better ways to resolve conflict

ncr 

Friday, May 24, 2019

The Editors: Roe v. Wade has made abortion politics impossible. It needs to be challenged.


America

Farther than Ever from Common Ground?


Hundreds of activists erupted into cheers at the Rhode Island Statehouse after the failure of an abortion-rights bill (CNS photo/Brian Fraga, Rhode Island Catholic)
These days it’s easy to give up hope that reasonable public discourse on abortion is possible. I admit to long suffering from what might be called abortion-politics fatigue, an ailment that flairs to acute levels as elections draw near and single-issue activists get louder, depicting their opponents as dangerous extremists. My condition, characterized by discouragement and bouts of cynicism, likely affects millions of voters given how out-of-sync abortion debates are with how most Americans approach the issue.

Hierarchy and the need for a 'culture of vulnerability'


Hierarchy and the need for a 'culture of vulnerability'

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter
May 22, 2019
By Tom Roberts
Hierarchy and vulnerability are seemingly incompatible ideas. Hierarchy (in the Catholic imagination) signals status, power, privilege and the ability to control. Vulnerability, on the other hand, signals weakness, a flaw of some sort. It is to be avoided.
But vulnerability, properly understood, is precisely what members of the Roman Catholic hierarchy need to embrace as a strength, argues Fr. James Keenan, a Jesuit theologian. If it is ever to understand an essential interior element at the core of our humanity, the absence of which lies at the core of the sex abuse crisis, the hierarchy must develop a culture of vulnerability.
Keenan, Canisius Professor and director of the Jesuit Institute at Boston College, is developing an important and fascinating insight into the abuse crisis, elevating the discussion about clerical and hierarchical culture well beyond the changes in law and protocols and institutional structure that the scandal has forced upon the church. So I'm going to stick to one subject this week, with connections to past columns on the same and a hope that the discussion continues in the future.
Two months ago, in a segment of this column, I made extended reference to an insightful piece by Fr. Mark Slatter, associate professor of theological ethics at St. Paul University, Ottawa, Ontario, on clerical culture. He generally described culture as "a network of personal meaning and valuing." In the clerical world, that means a psychology that "engenders webs of kinship among priests, bishops and similarly disposed lay groups, bishops and cardinals, wealthy lay Catholics and think tanks."

Sr. Joan Chittister's 2004 quote on 'pro-life' versus 'pro-birth' goes viral

Sr. Joan Chittister's 2004 quote on 'pro-life' versus 'pro-birth' goes viral

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