Friday, May 25, 2018

Legalizing abortion would betray Ireland’s future

Civic Virtue & the Common Good


Pope Francis addresses a joint meeting of Congress at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Sept. 24, 2015 (CNS? Paul Haring)
In this series, Bishop Robert McElroy addresses the importance of forming a Catholic political imagination in an age of division. Three authors—John T. McGreevy, Cathleen Kaveny, and Matthew Sitman—respond.

Robert W. McElroy
The contrast between the beautiful vision of politics that Pope Francis presented while speaking to a joint session of Congress in 2015 and the political state of our nation today is heartbreaking. Francis began his address by comparing the fundamental responsibilities of America’s political leaders to the role of Moses, emphasizing that the first call of public service is “to protect by means of the law the image and likeness fashioned by God on every human face.”
Recalling the martyrdom of Abraham Lincoln, Francis pointed to the foundational role that freedom plays in American society and politics, and noted that “building a future of freedom requires love of the common good and cooperation in a spirit of subsidiarity and solidarity.” Citing Dorothy Day and her thirst for justice in the world, the pope demanded that the economic genius of the American nation be complemented by an enduring recognition that all economies must serve justice

Francis locks in his reforms


From the editor's desk
The Tablet

23 May 2018

Francis locks in his reforms



New Cardinals
Those who oppose the papacy of Francis will have been dismayed by his announcement that he is naming 14 new cardinals, 11 of whom will be eligible to elect his successor. They include bishops from Iraq, Pakistan, Portugal, Peru, Madagascar and Japan – and the papal almoner, Archbishop Konrad Krajewski, who works among the poor people of Rome. They are all pastoral shepherds who know “the smell of the sheep”.
Francis has now created 47 per cent of the voting cardinals – those under 80 – which should more or less guarantee that the next pope will continue on the course this one has set. Some of his opponents have given up expecting him to change direction, but until now have hoped that a new pope would reverse some of his positions. In particular, they oppose Francis’ moves to admit divorced and remarried Catholics to Holy Communion under certain conditions, which the two previous popes had ruled out.

Nigerian cardinal rules out Catholic Communion for Protestants

Nigerian cardinal rules out Catholic Communion for Protestants

The Tablet

Cardinal Arinze says sharing Communion with Catholics cannot be an option for Protestants: 'It isn’t just that we wish one another well. After Mass you can go to the refectory and have a cup of tea and even a glass of beer and a bit of cake. That’s OK. But the Mass is not like that.'

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Innocent priests also suffered in the abuse crisis


Innocent priests also suffered in the abuse crisis

LONDON (ENGLAND)
Catholic Herald
May 21, 2018
By Francis Phillips

If Humanae Vitae was a 20th Century watershed moment in the Catholic laity’s response towards unchanging Church teaching on contraception, the sex abuse scandals which have battered the institution in recent decades have been an occasion for painful self-examination within it. They have brought about heart-searching, shame and humiliation. News that Cardinal George Pell, the most senior member of the hierarchy in Australia, is to stand trial for alleged sex abuse or that the entire Chilean episcopacy has offered its resignation to the Pope over scandals involving the church in Chile indicates that cover-ups and accusations still continue in this long-running explosive area.
I have just been reading The Burden of Betrayal: Non-Offending Priests and the Clergy Child Sexual Abuse Scandals by Barry O’Sullivan, published by Gracewing, a book that reveals another aspect to this painful saga: how the fall-out from the scandals has affected innocent members of the clergy. Ever since the news first broke of criminality and concealment in the Church, my thoughts and sympathy have gone not only to the young victims but to those affected by the collateral damage: all those conscientious, loyal, faithful men who have given their lives to their vocation only to see the priesthood torn to shreds by the media and in the eyes of the public.
Fr O’Sullivan, a priest in the Salford diocese, with long experience as the Salford diocesan child protection coordinator as well as ministering to priests in prison for sexual offences, has tried to address this aspect. Starting in 2012 he conducted lengthy interviews with six randomly selected priests, asking questions such as “Can you tell me about the experience of being a priest in the shadow of the child abuse scandal? And “How do you think the hierarchy dealt with this issue?”

Editorial: Francis should seize momentum of Chile resignations

Editorial: Francis should seize momentum of Chile resignations

Cardinals in the spotlight as Chile's crisis continues to reverberate