Saturday, September 14, 2019

Lay community key to reforming Catholicism



Lay community key to reforming Catholicism

Church conflict has become corrosive and toxic

Paul Collins
Australia
September 14, 2019
One of the most extraordinary recent examples of commitment is the loyalty shown by many post-Vatican II Catholics to the church.
Despite their steadfast support for the emphases of that Council, these lay Catholics, supported by many priests, are often seen as a 'nuisance' by senior church leaders whose real focus has been protecting their own positions and clericalist ideology.
Their commitment has been further tested by the sexual abuse scandals and the abject failure of many bishops in dealing with them.
The forthcoming Plenary Council (PC) of 2020/2021 will be a further test of the loyalty of these Catholics.
How serious are the bishops when they call on Catholics to 'engage in an open and inclusive experience of listening, dialogue and discernment about the future' of Australian Catholicism? Will they really listen to those who have remained loyal to the teachings of Vatican II?
Catholics for Renewal is one of several groups of Vatican II Catholics. It prepared a detailed submission for the PC and has now published that submission as a book, Getting Back on Mission: Reforming Our Church Together (Garratt Publishing, 2019).

To rescue a sinking church, think mission not membership


To rescue a sinking church, think mission not membership

The American Catholic Church is at a crossroads. Will it choose safety or discipleship?

By Jack Jezreel | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith
In Louisville, Kentucky, my hometown, there is a lifesaving parish called St. William. Every week, the single Sunday liturgy in the modest church building in an impoverished neighborhood is filled to capacity with a passionate mix of young and old; black, white, and brown; and religious and lay from dozens of zip codes.
St. William is a missional church. Everything on Sunday—from the opening song to the 20 minutes of announcements inviting action—is about mission. What the parish does in between Sundays is equally important. With over a dozen active ministries and projects that have evolved into important and impactful nonprofits, St. William has changed the city of Louisville.
It is exactly what Pope Francis would hope for. The parish Pope Francis is hoping for can happen. If it doesn’t, we will have to satisfy ourselves with being members of an exclusive club or find somewhere else to go. Sadly, data show that finding somewhere else to go is exactly what millions of Catholics, especially young people, are doing and will continue to do.

Why do some Catholics oppose Pope Francis?

Missouri investigation: 12 ex-clergy could face prosecution

Missouri investigation: 12 ex-clergy could face prosecution

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Mary Robinson: Disruption is best option left to head off climate disaster

Mary Robinson: Disruption is best option left to head off climate disaster

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Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time: Rejoice to find what was lost

Detail from "The Lost Sheep (The Parables of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ)," an 1864 engraving by the Dalziel Brothers, after Sir John Everett Millais (Wikimedia Commons/Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time: Rejoice to find what was lost

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Against all odds, Pope Francis has made Synods of Bishops interesting

Against all odds, Pope Francis has made Synods of Bishops interesting

Against all odds, Pope Francis has made Synods of Bishops interesting

John Allen, CRUX