Sunday, February 26, 2017

Pope Francis reversed decisions to kick paedophiles out of the priesthood


Pope Francis reversed decisions to kick paedophiles out of the priesthood

VATICAN CITY
Metro (UK)
Charles White
Sunday 26 Feb 2017
Pope Francis has reduced punishments for paedophile priests who abused children as young as 12.
The leader of the world’s biggest faith wants to apply his vision of a ‘merciful’ church and has changed the punishments for a handful of priests.
Italian priest Mauro Inzoli had been sentenced to be ‘defrocked’ (removed from the priesthood) in 2012, but Pope Francis reversed the decision in, telling him instead to stop public ministry and do penance and pray for the rest of his life.
The Inzoli case is said to be one of several similar cases when harsher sentences had been recommended by the Pope’s own advisory council on this issue, the Vatican Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

Amid hustle and bustle, Ash Wednesday forces us to think

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Remember, those who were once called 'other,' are now called 'American.'



Women deacons a possibility says cardinal


Women deacons a possibility says cardinal 

The Tablet

24 February 2017 | by Christa Pongratz-Lippitt

President of Pontifical Council for Culture, Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, thinks a women's diaconate could happen.

According to the President of the Pontifical Council for Culture, Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, the diaconate for women is a possibility.
Asked in a long interview for the German Church’s website katholisch.de on 24 February, what possibilities he saw for women in the Catholic Church, Ravasi replied, “The diaconate for women would, I think, be possible but it must of course, be discussed, as the historic tradition is very complex.”
He thought the present fixation on women’s ordination somewhat “clerical”, he said. “Why don’t we start talking about women taking on other most important functions in the Church such as women administering parishes, directing church finances or architectural planning?”
Asked how women were faring in the Vatican, Ravasi recalled that in his Permanent Women’s Consultation Group in the Council for Culture he had 35 women of very different backgrounds as advisers. “Among them there is a university professor, a mother, two Muslims, a Jewess, a non-believer, women from the fashion world and women journalists.” It was also their job to read and critically assess what the Council was doing from the feminine point of view. “Women see many things differently from men. Our women advisers help prepare our general assembly and take part. I hope our model will become a model for other Pontifical Councils”.
Ravasi said he was fully aware of the risk he was taking by allowing women consultors to play these roles. “If one of them were to say she was in favour of women’s ordination, for instance – and in my opinion it would be perfectly legitimate for her to express her opinion openly – the following headline would no doubt immediately go round the world, “Cardinal Ravasi suggests Women’s Ordination”. This sort of “ambiguity” in communications and the media was currently a very big problem, he declared.

Looking Back: Lucky Severson

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Religion&Ethics: PBS
“I see it all the time,” says Father Michael Doyle, a Roman Catholic priest in Camden, New Jersey, “a beauty that’s deep and wonderful and sometimes tragic, but beauty absolutely, I do. Their faces are there with their burdens and their wrinkles and their difficulties and so forth, but beauty that’s just jumping at you. More

On Giussani milestone, Communion and Liberation still going strong

On Giussani milestone, Communion and Liberation still going strong

On Giussani milestone, Communion and Liberation still going strong

John Allen

  • February 21, 2017
Today marks the 12th anniversary of the death of Monsignor Luigi Giussani, founder of the Communion and Liberation movement and a cinch for a first-ballot inductee if there were a Hall of Fame for 20th century Catholicism. Twelve years on, the community he launched is still going strong.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Disrupting the Donald


Disrupting the Donald

Bishop McElroy Draws Bright Moral Line
At a meeting of grassroots activists, faith-based organizers, farm workers, undocumented immigrants, clergy, and several bishops held in Modesto, California, last week, San Diego Bishop Robert McElroy gave the most powerful and timely address I’ve ever heard from a Catholic leader.
I will soon write a longer report about the first U.S.-gathering of the World Meeting of Popular Movements, where the bishop gave his speech and nearly 700 people met for panel discussions and small workshops at the three-day event organized by PICO National Network, the U.S. bishops’ Catholic Campaign for Human Development and the Vatican’s office for Promoting Integral Human Development.

We need Lent now more than ever

We need Lent now more than ever

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Young Voices: I wonder how the country might change if we Christians doubled down on our Lenten observance this year, inspired by the radical love poured out on the cross.