Tuesday, February 20, 2018

USCCB calls on Catholics to take action for Dreamers

Doubling Down on Nukes


A B-52H Stratofortress flies over Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota., January 30, 2018. This bomber, along with three others, recently deployed to Europe to exercise a state of readiness at RAF Fairford, United Kingdom. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jarad A. Denton
The famous “Doomsday Clock,” first unveiled in 1947 in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists [1] and periodically updated since, was recently reset at two minutes to midnight. Only once previously has the clock warned of being so ominously close to the nuclear abyss. That was back in 1953, shortly after the United States and the Soviet Union, engaged in an all-out arms race, had each detonated their first hydrogen bomb.
To judge by its Nuclear Posture Review [2] (NPR), released in early February, the Trump administration largely agrees with the Bulletin as to the gravity of the present moment. In his preface to the NPR, Secretary of Defense James Mattis describes an “international security situation that is more complex and demanding than any since the end of the Cold War,” while the body of the report warns of a “deteriorating threat environment.” Where the keepers of the Doomsday Clock and Trump administration officials like Mattis differ is in how they believe we should respond to these troubling developments.

Pope Francis hits back at those who cry 'heresy'


15 February 2018 | by Christopher Lamb in Rome

Pope Francis hits back at those who cry 'heresy' 

The Tablet


Failure to accept Second Vatican Council is at heart of resistance to pontificate, says Pope
Pope Francis has criticised those who make accusations of heresy and believe they possess the Church’s “true doctrine”, stating that it is not possible to dialogue with them.
In remarks made in a question and answer session with fellow Jesuits during his recent visit to Chile and Peru, the Latin American Pope said he is willing to have discussions with those resistance to his pontificate but has decided simply to pray for people accusing him of being a heretic.
Following the publication of his family life document opening the way for divorced and re-married Catholics to receive communion, there are those accusing Francis of breaking with church doctrine. Last September a small group of priests and theologians even accused him of allowing the spread of heresy. 

Correct, don't complicate excommunication of Lincoln's Call to Action members

Correct, don't complicate excommunication of Lincoln's Call to Action members

ncr

Editorial: We need a better vision for America

Editorial

Editorial: We need a better vision for America

Did the pope blink in Nigeria, or is it a typically Catholic mess?

Monday, February 19, 2018

Can students of the Parkland massacre make a difference in U.S. gun debate?



Joe Zevuloni weeps in front of a cross placed in a park to commemorate the victims of the shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 16. At least 17 people were killed in the Feb. 14 shooting. (CNS photo/Carlos Garcia Rawlins, Reuters) Joe Zevuloni weeps in front of a cross placed in a park to commemorate the victims of the shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 16. At least 17 people were killed in the Feb. 14 shooting. (CNS photo/Carlos Garcia Rawlins, Reuters)
Just months after his 18th birthday, three days after his troubling conduct led to his expulsion from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last year, the author of Ash Wednesday's suffering in Parkland, Fla., went to a gun store to buy a weapon. He was too young to buy a handgun; under federal law he would have to wait until he was 21.
But at 18 he was just the right age to buy a rifle—in some states he need not be any older than 14 or 16. He selected an AR-15, the civilian version of the military’s M16 rifle, and he used it to carry out the nation’s deadliest school shooting in more than five years.

Read more....

Pope updates resignation norms for Curia prelates


19 February 2018 | by Junno Arocho Esteves, CNS

Pope updates resignation norms for Curia prelates 

The Tablet




Vatican bishops and department heads will continue to hold office until Pope Francis accepts resignations
Updating the norms and regulations governing the resignation of bishops and of Roman Curia department heads who are not cardinals, Pope Francis said they will continue to hold office until he accepts their resignations.
The update was published in a document titled "Imparare a congedarsi", or "Learning to say farewell", that was given "motu proprio," meaning on the pope's own initiative. The new rules went into effect Feb. 15, the same day it was released by the Vatican press office.
The Code of Canon Law previously stated that a resignation that requires acceptance "lacks all force if it is not accepted within three months" while one that does not require acceptance "takes effect when it has been communicated by the one resigning."
However, the pope said that after consultation, he "became aware of the need to update the norms regarding the times and methods of resignation from office upon reaching the age limit."
Under the new norms, "the acceptance or extension, for a specified or unspecified amount of time, is communicated to the person" resigning.