Saturday, July 20, 2019

Why I Came



Pope Francis gets it right on Curia reform and women


July 20, 2019

Pope Francis gets it right on Curia reform and women

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter from Religion News Service
July 18, 2019
By Thomas Reese
In appointing seven women to the Vatican congregation that oversees religious orders July 9, Pope Francis achieved a double win. In one stroke, he has advanced both the role of women in the church and the reform of the Vatican Curia. This is significant because his efforts so far in these areas have been mediocre.
The Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life (CICLSAL), colloquially known as the Congregation for Religious, is responsible for setting policy for Catholic nuns, brothers and consecrated lay people. Acting like a board of directors, members are appointed by the pope for terms of five years to review major policy recommendations before they are approved by the pope.
Six of the women were elected superiors by their religious orders, indicating the respect they have in their communities. They are experienced and knowledgeable on the issues facing religious. The seventh is the president of a group of consecrated lay people.
Of all the Vatican offices, CICLSAL is the one that most directly impacts religious women. This is the office that instigated an infamous investigation of American nuns in 2008. It is crucial that the congregation have diversity in its membership. For example, with women religious at the table, it will be impossible to ignore the issue of sexual abuse of sisters by priests.

Vatican bans W.Va. bishop accused of sexual and financial misconduct from public ministry



Vatican bans W.Va. bishop accused of sexual and financial misconduct from public ministry

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Post
July 19, 2019
By Michael Brice-Saddler
https://www.washingtonpost.com/religion/2019/07/19/vatican-bans-wva-bishop-accused-sexual-financial-misconduct-public-ministry/
The Vatican on Friday announced sanctions against retired West Virginia bishop Michael Bransfield, but stopped short of defrocking him, after investigating accusations of sexual harassment and financial misconduct.
The sanctions, ordered by Pope Francis and detailed in a letter posted to the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston’s website, prohibit Bransfield from public ministry and from residing in his former West Virginia diocese. Bransfield also has “the obligation to make personal amends for some of the harm he caused,” the nature of which will be decided by the new bishop.
Bransfield stepped down in September when an aide came forward with an inside account detailing years of alleged sexual and financial misconduct, including a claim that Bransfield sought to “purchase influence” by giving hundreds of thousands in cash gifts to senior Catholic leaders. News of the allegations rocked parishioners in Wheeling-Charleston diocese, which Bransfield has led since 2005, and left other Catholics in the state feeling betrayed.

Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time: Real presence

Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time: Real presence

ncr 

Friday, July 19, 2019

FaithVideo Fr. James Martin, SJ, on how churches can combat hate crimes

America Films July 16, 2019
Fr. James Martin, SJ, testifies before the U.S. Helsinki Commission on why it is important for religious actors and organizations to stand against ha

Reform or Dismantle?

Reform or Dismantle?

NEW YORK (NY)
Commonweal
July 18, 2019
By Massimo Faggioli
One of the effects of the sex-abuse crisis is the current moment of institutional iconoclasm—the temptation to get rid of the institutional element of the Catholic Church. The failures of the church’s institutions are now on full display, even more so than after the revelations of the Spotlight investigation. It is hypocritical, however, to interpret the abuse crisis as a clerical abuse crisis rather than a Catholic abuse crisis. Obviously, the clergy had a unique role in the crisis, but the moral and legal responsibilities do not belong exclusively to those wearing a Roman collar. We are still reluctant to acknowledge the systemic nature of this crisis as something that affected the entire Catholic world and not just its ordained ministers. We would like to contain it neatly within the hierarchy so as to exempt ourselves from the burden of critical self-reflection.

How Mother Angelica's 'miracle of God' became a global media empire

How Mother Angelica's 'miracle of God' became a global media empire

ncr

Editorial: The politics of division stripped of any disguise

Editorial: The politics of division stripped of any disguise