Sunday, July 22, 2018

Kavanaugh would maintain the Catholic majority. What does that mean for the Supreme Court?

Kavanaugh would maintain the Catholic majority. What does that mean for the Supreme Court?

July 18, 2018 08:28 AM

Widening the ‘Pro-Life’ Frame


Demonstrators outside the U.S. Supreme Court on July 9 (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
When hundreds of Catholic bishops met last month in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, the Trump administration’s policy of separating immigrant children from parents at the border loomed large over the proceedings. The Catholic hierarchy has consistently denounced Donald Trump’s nativist policies, and the president of the conference, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, specifically framed [1] immigration as a “pro-life” issue.
“At its core, asylum is an instrument to preserve the right to life,” DiNardo said. One bishop even went so far as to suggest “canonical penalties,” which could include denial of communion for Catholics involved in implementing immigration policies the bishops’ conference calls “immoral.” While that proposal never gained traction, the fact that it was even raised in connection with an issue other than how to address pro-choice Catholic politicians is significant.

Revelations of US cardinal sex abuse will force pope’s hand

Revelations of US cardinal sex abuse will force pope’s hand

VATICAN CITY
Associated Press
July 21, 2018
By Nicole Winfield
Revelations that one of the most respected U.S. cardinals allegedly sexually abused both boys and adult seminarians have raised questions about who in the Catholic Church hierarchy knew — and what Pope Francis is going to do about it.
If the accusations against Cardinal Theodore McCarrick bear out — including a new case reported Friday involving an 11-year-old boy — will Francis revoke his title as cardinal? Sanction him to a lifetime of penance and prayer? Or even defrock him, the expected sanction if McCarrick were a mere priest?
And will Francis, who has already denounced a “culture of cover-up” in the church, take the investigation all the way to the top, where it will inevitably lead? McCarrick’s alleged sexual misdeeds with adults were reportedly brought to the Vatican’s attention years ago.

'Humanae Vitae' legacy is the call to selfless and free love

WHAT'S THE PROBLEM WITH WOMEN DEACONS?

WHAT'S THE PROBLEM WITH WOMEN DEACONS?

Critics do not recognize that the diaconate is a separate and permanent vocation and that ordination to the diaconate does not imply entry to priesthood.

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Friday, July 20, 2018

Summer lightning: the storm over birth control and Catholic Church 50 years ago

The Tablet

 Summer lightning: the storm over birth control and Catholic Church 50 years ago



Summer lightning: the storm over birth control and Catholic Church 50 years ago
Humanae Vitae at 50
Marches, teach-ins, petitions, boycotts, grass-roots collectives: radical initiatives that readily conjure up images of the May 1968 protests in Paris or the student sit-ins at the London School of Economics. Yet, in the summer of 1968, the publication of a papal encyclical was to provoke similar forms of protest.
This unlikely affront to the public conscience was, of course, Pope Paul VI’s encyclical letter condemning the use of artificial contraception, Humanae Vitae, which was published on 29 July. But while the restless radicals of the secular Left tended to be cosmopolitan intellectuals and avant-garde youth, the Catholic “counter-culture” was thoroughly conventional, respectable and middle-class.
The scale of the revolt, which encompassed laity and clergy, was national in reach and local in action, and drew on tight-knit parochial, professional and educational networks. Though it might be tempting to cast this moment as a Catholic equivalent to the politically left-wing and theologically liberal “South Bank religion” of John Robinson and Mervyn Stockwood, these dissenters’ heartland was suburban London and Surrey.